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Christmas Recipes

The book launch for Maggie Pill's newest, ONCE UPON A TRAILER PARK, was a great deal of fun. People asked for the recipes for several items served, so here they are.

Chicken Spread
1 pint canned chicken
1 8-oz. package cream cheese
1/2 c. chopped onion
Drain chicken and save juice. Blend chicken, cream cheese, and onion. Add some of the juice if mixture is too dry. Season to taste with salt & pepper. Serve with crackers.

Cinnamon Toasted Pecans
1 pound pecans, whole or halves
1 egg white
1 tablespoon water
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
Preheat oven to 300 degrees. In a medium-sized bowl, beat egg white and water to a froth. In a large zip-bag, combine sugar, salt, and cinnamon. Coat pecans with the egg/water mixture then drop them into the bag and shake, coating well. Spread on greased cookie sheet and bake for 40 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes.
Cool on waxed paper. (These freeze well, but seldom last long!)

Chocolate Peanut-Butter Clusters
In a large saucepan combine
½ c. light corn syrup
½ c. chocolate chips
¼ c. sugar
½ c. peanut butter
3 c. toasted “O” oat cereal, plain, not sweetened
Combine corn syrup, chips, and sugar and cook on medium heat just until bubbles break the surface. Add peanut butter and cereal; mix well. Drop by teaspoons onto waxed paper. Makes about 3 dozen.



Buckeyes
In a large mixing bowl, combine
2 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. margarine or butter, softened
3 c. powdered sugar
Mix well. Form into balls about 1 inch in diameter. Roll between palms to condense and firm. Chill in refrigerator for an hour or so.
In a small, deep bowl, melt one 12-ounce package of chocolate chips with 1/4 bar of wax.
Using a toothpick, dip balls into warm chocolate, leaving the “eye” of peanut butter showing. Set on waxed paper to cool. Makes about 5 dozen.



Oreo Truffles
1 package Oreo-type cookies (not double-stuffed)
1 8 oz. package cream cheese
Squash cookies to fine crumbs. Stir in softened cream cheese. Roll into balls and chill for an hour.
Melt 12 oz. white chocolate. Using a toothpick, dip balls into chocolate and set on waxed paper until they harden. Store in a cool place. About 3 dozen.


Bacon-wrapped Water Chestnuts                        

Cut bacon strips in half and wrap around a whole water chestnut, secure with a toothpick
Bake on a rack set in a sheet pan for 30 minutes at 400 degrees.
Remove from oven, drain grease, and brush with sauce of your choice. Your favorite barbecue sauce is fine, or you can combine 1/3 c. ketchup, 1/3 c. brown sugar, and a tablespoon of Worcestershire sauce. Cook for 12-15 minutes more, until they're done to your liking.

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