Showing posts with label recipes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label recipes. Show all posts

Dec 8, 2019

Christmas Recipes

The book launch for Maggie Pill's newest, ONCE UPON A TRAILER PARK, was a great deal of fun. People asked for the recipes for several items served, so here they are.

Chicken Spread
1 pint canned chicken
1 8-oz. package cream cheese
1/2 c. chopped onion
Drain chicken and save juice. Blend chicken, cream cheese, and onion. Add some of the juice if mixture is too dry. Season to taste with salt & pepper. Serve with crackers.

Cinnamon Toasted Pecans
1 pound pecans, whole or halves
1 egg white
1 tablespoon water
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
Preheat oven to 300 degrees. In a medium-sized bowl, beat egg white and water to a froth. In a large zip-bag, combine sugar, salt, and cinnamon. Coat pecans with the egg/water mixture then drop them into the bag and shake, coating well. Spread on greased cookie sheet and bake for 40 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes.
Cool on waxed paper. (These freeze well, but seldom last long!)

Chocolate Peanut-Butter Clusters
In a large saucepan combine
½ c. light corn syrup
½ c. chocolate chips
¼ c. sugar
½ c. peanut butter
3 c. toasted “O” oat cereal, plain, not sweetened
Combine corn syrup, chips, and sugar and cook on medium heat just until bubbles break the surface. Add peanut butter and cereal; mix well. Drop by teaspoons onto waxed paper. Makes about 3 dozen.



Buckeyes
In a large mixing bowl, combine
2 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. margarine or butter, softened
3 c. powdered sugar
Mix well. Form into balls about 1 inch in diameter. Roll between palms to condense and firm. Chill in refrigerator for an hour or so.
In a small, deep bowl, melt one 12-ounce package of chocolate chips with 1/4 bar of wax.
Using a toothpick, dip balls into warm chocolate, leaving the “eye” of peanut butter showing. Set on waxed paper to cool. Makes about 5 dozen.



Oreo Truffles
1 package Oreo-type cookies (not double-stuffed)
1 8 oz. package cream cheese
Squash cookies to fine crumbs. Stir in softened cream cheese. Roll into balls and chill for an hour.
Melt 12 oz. white chocolate. Using a toothpick, dip balls into chocolate and set on waxed paper until they harden. Store in a cool place. About 3 dozen.


Bacon-wrapped Water Chestnuts                        

Cut bacon strips in half and wrap around a whole water chestnut, secure with a toothpick
Bake on a rack set in a sheet pan for 30 minutes at 400 degrees.
Remove from oven, drain grease, and brush with sauce of your choice. Your favorite barbecue sauce is fine, or you can combine 1/3 c. ketchup, 1/3 c. brown sugar, and a tablespoon of Worcestershire sauce. Cook for 12-15 minutes more, until they're done to your liking.

Dec 19, 2014

Pecan Pie Bars

Just what they sound like--great for parties

Crust:
1/2 c. oleo
1/2 c. shortening
1 c. brown sugar
2 c. flour
Mix well and press into 9x13" pan.
Bake at 350 degrees for 10 minutes

Topping:
Mix
5 eggs
1 c. syrup (I use light but recipe says you can use light or dark)
3/4 c. sugar
1 tsp. vanilla
2 c. pecans, broken

Pour mixture over crust and bake at 275 degrees for about 50 min. Cut into bars.

Dec 17, 2014

Yum-yum Pie

Also called Macaroon Pie, this one's easy but really good!

In a blender:
2 eggs
1 c. milk
3/4 c. sugar
1/2 c. flour
2 tbsp. melted butter/oleo
1/2 tsp. vanilla
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1/2 tsp. salt
Blend well. Pour into greased pie plate and sprinkle with 1 c. flaked coconut.
Bake at 350 degrees for 35-40 minutes, until golden brown.

Dec 14, 2014

Recipe: Simple Sauce for Sunday

The easiest and best hot fudge sauce for ice cream, desserts (or even to eat with a spoon, as someone I know well tends to do).

1 can sweetened condensed milk
1 square baking chocolate
1 scoop peanut butter (more or less to your taste)

Melt the baking chocolate in a saucepan. Pour in milk and mix well over low heat. Add peanut butter for a creamy consistency and rich taste. Stores well in the fridge, I hear, but it never lasts long at my house so I can't speak to that! Put it in a pretty jar and it makes a great gift, too.


Dec 13, 2014

Reindeer Cookies

Any sugar cookie recipe will do for these cookies, but here's one that's good. It's the decorations that make them fun.

1/2 c. margarine/butter, softened
4 oz. cream cheese
1 1/4 c. powdered sugar
1 egg
1 1/2 tsp.
vanilla extract
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. baking powder
3 c. flour

Oven 350 degrees
 Combine butter, cream cheese, and p. sugar with a mixer until light and fluffy. Add egg, vanilla, salt, and baking powder. With mixer on low, add flour until dough holds together. Make it into a ball, wrap in plastic wrap, and chill at least 1 hour.
On lightly floured surface, roll dough 1/4 inch thick and cut into triangle shapes. Bake 15 minutes until edges brown lightly. Cool completely.
Frost cookies with chocolate icing. Break pretzel loops off and set them along top edge for antlers. Add candies or dots of colored frosting for for eyes and noses.

Dec 12, 2014

Cookie Cutter Cakes

This recipe can get a little fussy, but that's what it's all about in Christmas baking, right?

1 1/2 c. sugar
1/2 c. oleo/butter
1/4 c. shortening
1/2 c. milk
3 eggs
1 1/2 c. flour
Flavorings (see below)

Combine the first six ingredients and blend for 2 minutes at medium speed. Add flavorings you want from this list or make up your own. I like to divide up the batter and make three or four differently flavored cakes, which takes smaller pans. If you make it all the same flavor, use a 9x13 pan.
  For egg nog: 1 tsp. nutmeg, 2 tsp. rum extract, 1/2 c. chopped nuts
  For cherry: 1 tsp. almond extract, 8 oz. jar of chopped maraschino cherries
  For lemon: 2 tsp. lemon juice, 2 tsp. grated lemon peel
  For orange: 2 tsp. orange juice, 2 tsp grated orange peel
  For nut: 1 tsp. vanilla, 1/2 tsp. almond extract, 1/2 c. chopped nuts
  For coconut: 1/2 tsp. coconut extract, 1/4 tsp. almond extract, 1/3 c. flaked coconut

Bake 25-35 minutes at 350 degrees. Cool, cut into shapes (if desired), and dip in thin confectioners' icing. (Mix 1 tsp. of vanilla with one tbsp of butter and 1/4 c. milk. Add powdered sugar until the consistency is right.)
Of course you can color the icing and put sprinkles, etc. on these petits four type cakes.

Dec 10, 2014

Candy Cane Cookies

1/2 c. butter or margarine (softened)
1/2 c. shortening
1 c. powdered sugar
1 egg
1/1/2 tsp. almond extract
1 tsp. vanilla
2/ 1/2 c. flour
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. red food coloring


Oven: 375
Mix butter, shortening, p. sugar well, add egg and flavorings.
Blend in flour & salt
Divide dough in half; color one half red.
Shape 1 tsp. of dough from each half into ropes by rolling on lightly floured board. Place ropes side by side, pinch ends together, and twist to form candy cane shape. Bend one end to make the crook.
Place on ungreased baking sheet and bake about 9 minutes, until set and very light brown.
If desired, frost/sprinkle.
Makes about 4 dozen

Dec 1, 2014

What's the Thing with Cookbooks?

I signed at Horizon in TC on Saturday, and a staff member told me about an earlier event with a famous (I guess) chef. She said they sold boxes and boxes of his books, with people calling and begging them to save one until they could get there.
Which brought to my mind a question: What's the thing with cookbooks?
When you're starting out in life, you need a good cookbook, and it might take you two or three purchases before you find one that fits your lifestyle and abilities. After that, you might want to purchase a couple of specialty cookbooks: Chinese food or low-fat or whatever. But once you've got six or eight, what's the attraction for buying more?
I haven't bought a cookbook in twenty years except for some they sold at church, and that was more the cause than the desire for new recipes. I'm in the minority, I know. Cookbook sales are huge, and if some chef who's been on TV puts one out, sales are guaranteed to go through the roof.
Why?
I don't know, but here's why I'm not in line for the next big thing in cookbooks. I'm not a chef (and I don't play one on television). I find most of the recipes too complicated and the results kind of blah. That's possibly my fault, but how often am I willing to waste time and food in order to serve a triumphant flan or a perfect quiche? If I want fancy food, it's easier to order it at a restaurant where the people have practiced the dish more often than I ever will.
I never seem to have all the "simple" ingredients they call for in cookbooks. I don't have to look in my pantry to see if I have marzipan: I don't. My spices are all on the downward end of their expiration dates. And yeast? Don't make me laugh. We buy it, we use one packet of the three or four provided, and the rest sit in the cupboard until we end up throwing them away. If I do have a yen for something new for dinner, by the time I've discarded the recipes for which I don't have the ingredients, it's beef stew again.
So why do so many people eagerly buy a new cookbook every year or even every few months? I think we're buying a dream--a lovely image of perfect meals that make our families gasp in wonder. And the nice thing is, if the cookbook you bought last Saturday doesn't make that happen, there's always another guy in a white hat or or woman with a foreign accent who'll sell you a new one.


Note: Since I love baking, I have included one of my own favorite recipes at the right. New one every day until Christmas.

Jun 11, 2014

What's Cooking?

Many authors have success with mysteries that include great dinner recipes. You won't see that from me, since I've never been fond of cooking. (Now, baking is another story!) Anyway, today we're checking your knowledge of soups/stews: What's the main ingredient?

1. Bouillabaisse
2. Gaspacho
3. Borscht
4.Avgolemono
5. Menudo









Answers
1. Fish
2. Tomato base w/vegetables
3. Beets
4. Egg/lemon
5. Beef stomach

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